Fear of Syringe(Trypanophobia)


Since childhood I rarely fall ill.The part of medical treatment I mostly fear is the syringe which is mostly called as trypanophobia.

Everyone in our childhood have this fear.Whenever I got fever the first thing I would ask Doctor is to give me tablets instead of an injection. What fears me most is the pricking of the needle.Whenever the doctor said I have to take an injection I used to cry and it was  my father who used to encourage me a lot.Still I used to resist while taking an injection.Mostly it was the skill of the nurse to persuade me to take an injection.I used to close my eyes.Usually it feels like a prolonged ant or a mosquito bite. 

As I grew up this fear ceased to great extent with understanding that injecting drugs (medicines ) is a fast and effective way of curing illness.Still I fear the pricking of needle on fingers for a blood test and the blood test using syringe.

I would like to ask readers as to how to overcome the fear of taking injection while taking medical treatment.

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28 thoughts on “Fear of Syringe(Trypanophobia)

    • kiranmag says:

      I fear the most when I see the nurse clearing the the air gap in the syringe and then rubs the spirit cotton ball on the place where the injection is to be given…I shut my eyes …trying to myself to keep as steady as possible. ..if the liquid drug is too viscous it pains a lot when it is forced out of the syringe

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Mackenzie says:

    I wish that I had an easy solution for ya!!!! I know the feel of needles is so very real. If you make conversation with whoever is giving the injection and look away that usually helps. Maybe have a stress ball to squeeze in your opposite hand as well too. That will help the brain redirect some of that sensory information. Deep breaths are always a good thing to implement too. Just know that there is so little bad that can come from needles, as scary as they are! Sorry if I don’t have much better advice!!! xo

    Liked by 2 people

    • kiranmag says:

      That’s really a best advice ….from a wonderful and generous person who gives an injection…a sweet conversation between the paitient and nurse diverts attention of the paitent and reduces fear to almost zero. I think the conversation should go on untill the needle is withdrawn .
      ….That’s so nice of you Dear Sister Mackenzie to give such a perfect advice….it reveals the depth of involvement in your profession….wishing you all the very best in your career and I am damn sure you will be the most liked nurse by all of your patients varying from children to old aged ones

      Liked by 1 person

  2. preeti says:

    Nice post Kiran
    When I was child I also had fear of injection,pain.But,as I grow now I don’t feel pain,and as a health care professionals I worked in a government hospital and you or we already know how much rush in government hospital, no one cares you feel pain or not,because they don’t have time.
    On June, I was posted in emergency,in my 8 hours duty I also injected lots of injections everyday. But I try to give special care to child’s.

    Yes, when needle pricks your skin and veins then pain sensation message transfer to your brain. I don’t have any cure of this. Even when doctors do operation they firstly give anaesthesia to patients,while giving anaesthesia we have to prick the needle.

    According to psychology if you think or concentrate about someone more then it takes your attention more. So,just try to divert your mind. Whenever nurse going to inject, just start day dreaming about anything that you like the most for example
    Your favorite food
    A date with your crush or boyfriend
    A emotional memory or
    A laughing joke ,
    Just anything that takes your attention away.

    Fun part of my life.I don’t have any fear of injections but my dad don’t go to hospital because he fears alot 😂😂

    Just try Kiran
    Have a good day! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

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